Carmen Pisani: Food booth, Honey Products, Baking

Carmen Pisani: Food booth, Honey Products, Baking

Carmen and Jim Pisani, of Ta’Pisani Farms in Maxwell, comprise the market’s faithful food concession booth for 12 years. Customers amass at their table for hot burgers, homemade cinnamon buns and Carmen’s infamous weekly specials.
After moving to Grey County from the city, Carmen says being poised as the market’s hot food purveyor was bolstered by a lifelong passion for cooking and preparing food. In addition, serving food is seasoned with a warm camaraderie shared with hungry customers and fellow vendors, a natural pleasure of the business.
“I like dealing with people,” says Carmen.
Their 100-acre farm, a joint venture between the Pisanis and their son Joe and his wife Tanya, also a market vendor, is home to a menagerie of animals.
“All animals are welcome,” Carmen jokes.
The farm is also the home base of Jim’s ever-evolving honey business, which he launched over a decade ago after years of inspiration gleaned from reading beekeeping and honey production articles. Jim’s apiary, both a pastime and source of profit, is a tribute to a lifelong inclusion of honey in the diet and an attempt to help educate consumers about honey products whilst dispelling the myths surrounding raw honey. Jim says he sought the opportunity to keep bees for years on a farm and hopes to continue his avocation despite challenges honey producers face in the wake of colony collapse disorder, the current honeybee crisis.
Equipped with a wellspring of information about the “buzz” of the bee business – for example, that a queen bee could lay up to 2,000 eggs a day (!) – Jim and his wife are always eager to ignite conversation while the griddle heats up and the coffee water boils.